Poorer Cognitive Function Found in Older Adults with CIs Adults age 55 and older who have cochlear implants (CIs) for severe hearing loss show reduced cognitive performance compared with age-matched, typically hearing peers, finds a study in Frontiers in Neuroscience by researchers at Antwerp University Hospital in Belgium. The group with severe hearing loss included 61 older adults (median ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2018
Poorer Cognitive Function Found in Older Adults with CIs
Author Notes
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2018
Poorer Cognitive Function Found in Older Adults with CIs
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 19. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23122018.19
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 19. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23122018.19
Adults age 55 and older who have cochlear implants (CIs) for severe hearing loss show reduced cognitive performance compared with age-matched, typically hearing peers, finds a study in Frontiers in Neuroscience by researchers at Antwerp University Hospital in Belgium.
The group with severe hearing loss included 61 older adults (median age 71) with one to 18 years of experience with their CIs. The control group included 81 participants with a median age of 69.
The study authors devised their own cognitive test for all participants and also performed audiometric assessments. They found that even when controlling for age, sex and education level, the older adults fitted with CIs performed significantly worse on the cognitive function test (the RBANS-H, Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status for Hearing-impaired individuals) compared to the control group of typically hearing adults (who completed the RBANS).

Even when controlling for age, sex and education level, the older adults fitted with CIs performed significantly worse on the cognitive function test.

This test battery yields one total cognition score from the assessment of five domains: immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention and delayed memory.
The authors suggest follow-up care and counseling for elderly patients fitted with CIs. “Additional rehabilitation in the long term after implantation, tailored to the cognitive profile of individuals, may be appropriate for cochlear implant patients,” says author Griet Mertens, a professor in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Antwerp University Hospital.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12