Capping Children’s Daily Screen Time at 2 Hours Linked With Better Cognition Limiting children’s recreational screen time to two hours per day, and coupling this with a good night’s sleep and sufficient physical activity, may mean better cognitive function. In a study in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute examined data from a ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2018
Capping Children’s Daily Screen Time at 2 Hours Linked With Better Cognition
Author Notes
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2018
Capping Children’s Daily Screen Time at 2 Hours Linked With Better Cognition
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23122018.18
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23122018.18
Limiting children’s recreational screen time to two hours per day, and coupling this with a good night’s sleep and sufficient physical activity, may mean better cognitive function.
In a study in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute examined data from a longitudinal, observational study of 4,500 U.S. children. The researchers looked at the self-reported data on sleeping habits, physical activity and daily screen time. They used the NIH Toolbox to measure six cognitive domains: language abilities, episodic memory, executive function, attention, working memory and processing speed.
The researchers then measured the results against the Canadian 24-hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth, which offer three recommendations for cognitive development: 9–11 hours of sleep a night, less than two hours of recreational screen time and at least an hour of daily physical activity. The results showed that the child participants spent an average of 3.6 hours a day engaged in recreational screen time.
The study also showed that 29 percent met none of the recommended guidelines, 41 percent met only one criterion, 25 percent met two, and 5 percent met all three. Further, the more recommendations a child met, the better the child’s cognition scores.

The results showed that the child participants spent an average of 3.6 hours a day engaged in recreational screen time.

And, compared with meeting none of the recommendations, participants who met all three recommendations, the screen time recommendation only, and both the screen time and sleep recommendations had better global cognition.
“Based on our findings, pediatricians, parents, educators, and policymakers should promote limiting recreational screen time and prioritizing healthy sleep routines throughout childhood and adolescence,” says study author Jeremy Walsh of Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12