Girls May Excel More at Reading and Writing Than Boys Girls may have the edge on their male counterparts in at least two areas: reading and writing, according to a study in American Psychologist (bit.ly/write-read). Using a large, nationally representative data sample, researchers from Griffith University in Australia analyzed standardized test scores from more than 3 million students in the ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2018
Girls May Excel More at Reading and Writing Than Boys
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / International & Global / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2018
Girls May Excel More at Reading and Writing Than Boys
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.23122018.16
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.23122018.16
Girls may have the edge on their male counterparts in at least two areas: reading and writing, according to a study in American Psychologist (bit.ly/write-read). Using a large, nationally representative data sample, researchers from Griffith University in Australia analyzed standardized test scores from more than 3 million students in the fourth, eighth and 12th grades over three decades.
Analyzing scores from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the researchers found that as early as fourth grade, girls exhibited better reading and writing ability. The gap in scores only increased with age. And the authors noted a greater difference in scores for writing skills.

As early as fourth grade, girls exhibited better reading and writing ability [than boys]. The gap in scores only increased with age.

The authors pose several theories to explain the gap in reading and writing achievement, including peer pressure for boys to forgo reading as it may not be considered “masculine” and the higher statistical probability for boys to have a learning disorder.
“It [the study] suggests that we need to better tailor our education to meet the needs of boys and really encourage in them early a love not just of reading, but also writing,” says lead author David Reilly, a Griffith doctoral student.
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December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12