CDC Issues Treatment Guidelines for Pediatric Concussion New clinical guidelines for the treatment of children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) include five practice-changing recommendations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued “Guideline on the Diagnosis and Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Among Children,” published in JAMA Pediatrics. The report, covering 25 years of ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   December 01, 2018
CDC Issues Treatment Guidelines for Pediatric Concussion
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Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2018
CDC Issues Treatment Guidelines for Pediatric Concussion
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.23122018.15
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.23122018.15
New clinical guidelines for the treatment of children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) include five practice-changing recommendations.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued “Guideline on the Diagnosis and Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Among Children,” published in JAMA Pediatrics. The report, covering 25 years of research, is based on the most comprehensive review of the science on pediatric mTBI—also known as concussion—to date.
The 19 sets of clinical recommendations cover diagnosis, prognosis, and management and treatment. The CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline outlines specific actions health care providers can take to help young patients and their parents/caregivers, including five key practice-changing recommendations:
  • Do not routinely image pediatric patients to diagnose mTBI.

  • Use validated, age-appropriate symptom scales to diagnose mTBI.

  • Assess risk factors for prolonged recovery, including history of mTBI or other brain injury, severe symptom presentation immediately after the injury, and personal characteristics and family history (such as learning difficulties and family and social stressors).

  • Provide patients and their parents/caregivers with instructions on returning to activity customized to their symptoms.

  • Counsel patients and their parents/caregivers to return gradually to non-sports activities after no more than two to three days of rest.

To help health care providers implement the recommendations, the CDC developed supporting tools and materials, ranging from screening forms to assess young patients to discharge instructions and recovery tips for parents.
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December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12