Newborn Hearing Screening on the Rise The number of U.S. newborns who receive recommended screening for hearing loss has increased by 45 percentage points, but about 3 percent of U.S. newborns still are not being screened, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The federally funded, state-based Early Hearing Detection ... News in Brief
Free
News in Brief  |   December 01, 2018
Newborn Hearing Screening on the Rise
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2018
Newborn Hearing Screening on the Rise
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.23122018.14
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.23122018.14
The number of U.S. newborns who receive recommended screening for hearing loss has increased by 45 percentage points, but about 3 percent of U.S. newborns still are not being screened, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The federally funded, state-based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs have helped boost the number of children screened for hearing loss from 52 percent in 2000 to 97 percent in 2014, according to the report.
During that same time period, the number of documented diagnoses of hearing loss following screening increased sixfold, from 855 to 6,163.
About 1.6 of every 1,000 infants in the United States have permanent hearing loss at birth. EHDI program guidelines call for all newborns to be screened for hearing loss by age 1 month, diagnosed by 3 months, and enrolled in early intervention by 6 months.
The CDC report also shows progress in the number of infants meeting those thresholds:
  • From 2005 to 2014, the percentage of infants who failed newborn hearing screening and who were documented by their state EHDI program as receiving a completed diagnostic evaluation increased from 30 percent to 58 percent.

  • Among infants with confirmed hearing loss, documented enrollment in early intervention during the same period increased from 58 percent to 65 percent.

In addition, the number of infants lost to follow-up or documentation (failure to report the results from hearing screening, rescreening, diagnostic services or treatment) has decreased.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12