Pseudo-Scientific Encroachment Brady Lund’s article, “Our Role in Helping Clients Recognize Misinformation,” is unfortunately all too apt in identifying the problem of pseudo-scientific encroachment into the lives of our clients. Even when not outright dangerous, these pseudo-scientific schemes are, without exception, a waste of financial resources. To paraphrase what a former client ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   December 01, 2018
Pseudo-Scientific Encroachment
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / Inbox
Inbox   |   December 01, 2018
Pseudo-Scientific Encroachment
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN3.23122018.6
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN3.23122018.6
Brady Lund’s article, “Our Role in Helping Clients Recognize Misinformation,” is unfortunately all too apt in identifying the problem of pseudo-scientific encroachment into the lives of our clients. Even when not outright dangerous, these pseudo-scientific schemes are, without exception, a waste of financial resources. To paraphrase what a former client told me, “Ever since my child was diagnosed, I feel like everyone is trying to make a buck off my misfortune.” Worse still, they can result in death and destruction of families and reputations.
I was also heartened to see ASHA President Elise McFarland’s response to an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal that promoted the rapid prompting method. I hope that ASHA will continue to confront these pseudo-scientific methods whenever they gain public attention.
Paul Bishop, Irvine, California

Helping clients evaluate information is critical for all clinicians. Thank you for helping to spread the word.

0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12