Family Involvement in the Clinic I was excited to see Dathan Rush’s article, “From Couching to Coaching,” in the October Leader! I offer the argument that coaching is possible in the clinic setting as well. At our family-focused clinic, we welcome the entire family into sessions, which means our waiting room is often empty—and sometimes ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   December 01, 2018
Family Involvement in the Clinic
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Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Inbox
Inbox   |   December 01, 2018
Family Involvement in the Clinic
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.23122018.5
The ASHA Leader, December 2018, Vol. 23, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.23122018.5
I was excited to see Dathan Rush’s article, “From Couching to Coaching,” in the October Leader! I offer the argument that coaching is possible in the clinic setting as well.
At our family-focused clinic, we welcome the entire family into sessions, which means our waiting room is often empty—and sometimes we have to deviate from our “plan” to go with what works for the family. I think the key principle to keep in mind is that caregiver and family involvement will trump whatever “environment” where therapy takes place.
It’s true that children learn best through interactions with caregivers during daily activities, but the verdict is still out on whether it really makes a difference where therapy takes place. What we do know is that caregiver involvement does matter, and that the relationship the SLP has with primary caregivers certainly makes all the difference with child outcomes.
Holly Cook, Sacramento, California

Thank you for pointing out the important role of family involvement and the caregiver-clinician relationship in successful early-intervention outcomes.

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December 2018
Volume 23, Issue 12