Children With Depression Appear More Likely to Struggle Socially, Academically Children showing symptoms of mild to severe depression are six times more likely to experience difficulty with both social skills and academics than children without symptoms, finds a study in the Journal of School Psychology. Researchers from the University of Missouri (MU) and Johns Hopkins University examined child, parent and ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   November 01, 2018
Children With Depression Appear More Likely to Struggle Socially, Academically
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School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   November 01, 2018
Children With Depression Appear More Likely to Struggle Socially, Academically
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23112018.11
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23112018.11
Children showing symptoms of mild to severe depression are six times more likely to experience difficulty with both social skills and academics than children without symptoms, finds a study in the Journal of School Psychology.
Researchers from the University of Missouri (MU) and Johns Hopkins University examined child, parent and teacher ratings of child depressive symptoms for 643 elementary school children in Hawaii. Measures were taken at two data points: second and third grade. Additional measures included children’s social skills, externalizing symptoms, attention problems, and language and academic competence.

The researchers found that students showing severe signs of depression were six times more likely to have skill deficits than their peers.

The study aimed to identify patterns of agreement and discrepancy between student, teacher and parent reporting of students’ mental health. The researchers found that students showing severe signs of depression were six times more likely than their peers to have skill deficits. Also, researchers noted that parents and teachers often did not identify depressed students (those who self-reported as feeling mildly to severely depressed) as depressed.
“When you ask teachers and parents to rate a child’s level of depression, there is usually only about 5- to 10-percent overlap in their ratings,” says Keith Herman, professor in the MU College of Education. “For example, the teacher might report that a child has difficulties making friends in class, but the parent might not notice this issue at home.”
1 Comment
November 7, 2018
Natalie Hibbs
More Information Needed!
I have a student/client that is in re-evaluation and has a diagnosis of depression/anxiety and a "pragmatics" disorder. Evidence gathered identifies that there isn't a pragmatics disorder, but the parent and another SLP are having a hard time differentiating between what is considered a symptom of the student's mental health and what is a social skill. Most of the information related to mental health I have found has been related to Stuttering and isn't much help. I know that students/clients with Autism can struggle with mental health due to issues with Pragmatics, but this is a separate issue as well. I encourage discussion with Psychologist and if possible, Psychiatrists or counselor as well, but there doesn't seem to be much research in this area.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2018
Volume 23, Issue 11