Training Program May Accelerate Diagnosis, Early Intervention for Autism A year-long training course for primary care providers was linked to earlier diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. In a study from the University of Missouri-Columbia published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 18 providers in underserved areas of Missouri received training and coaching via the ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   November 01, 2018
Training Program May Accelerate Diagnosis, Early Intervention for Autism
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Early Identification & Intervention / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   November 01, 2018
Training Program May Accelerate Diagnosis, Early Intervention for Autism
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.23112018.10
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.23112018.10
A year-long training course for primary care providers was linked to earlier diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. In a study from the University of Missouri-Columbia published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 18 providers in underserved areas of Missouri received training and coaching via the ECHO Autism program.
The program curriculum combined in-person sessions as well as remote, video-based coaching on how to diagnose ASD. Participants included primary care providers, family physicians and pediatricians receiving coaching from autism experts (clinical psychologist, social worker, dietician, psychiatrist, parent and pediatrician specializing in the developmental disorder).

Children in these underserved areas received autism diagnoses two to six months faster than waiting for a referral to the nearest autism center.

Children seen by program graduates in these underserved areas received autism diagnoses two to six months faster than those who waited for a referral to the nearest autism center, according to the researchers.
“All participants reported that they had changed their practice as a result of participation in the program, and they felt confident in their abilities to screen and diagnose autism early on, which is incredibly beneficial to families,” says study author Kristin Sohl of the University of Missouri-Columbia, who directs the ECHO Autism program.
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November 2018
Volume 23, Issue 11