Low Electrical Currents May Boost Aphasia Outcomes Using noninvasive adjunctive brain stimulation in addition to speech treatment may improve outcomes for patients with aphasia following a stroke, indicates research in JAMA Neurology. Neuroscientists from the University of South Carolina and the Medical University of South Carolina, led by Julius Fridriksson, evaluated the effectiveness of transcranial direct current ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   November 01, 2018
Low Electrical Currents May Boost Aphasia Outcomes
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Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   November 01, 2018
Low Electrical Currents May Boost Aphasia Outcomes
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.23112018.10
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.23112018.10
Using noninvasive adjunctive brain stimulation in addition to speech treatment may improve outcomes for patients with aphasia following a stroke, indicates research in JAMA Neurology.
Neuroscientists from the University of South Carolina and the Medical University of South Carolina, led by Julius Fridriksson, evaluated the effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on speech outcomes. Researchers divided 74 stroke patients (mean age of 60) with aphasia lasting at least six months into two groups. One group received tDCS (applied via electrodes attached to the scalp) in addition to speech treatment; the other group received placebo brain stimulation treatment with speech treatment over the course of three weeks.

Anodal tDCS during speech therapy is feasible and potentially transformative for aphasia treatment.

Progress was measured during naming tests in speech treatment. Participants in the tDCS group could successfully name 14 objects on average, and the placebo group could name eight on average.
“Anodal tDCS during speech therapy is feasible and potentially transformative for aphasia treatment and should be further studied,” the study authors conclude.
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November 2018
Volume 23, Issue 11