CDC Adds Teens to Autism Surveillance The Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDM) will include the experiences of teenagers and expand its survey of 4-year-olds in its biannual surveillance of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States. Traditionally, researchers in the ADDM—part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—review health and educational ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2018
CDC Adds Teens to Autism Surveillance
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2018
CDC Adds Teens to Autism Surveillance
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.23112018.8
The ASHA Leader, November 2018, Vol. 23, 8. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.23112018.8
The Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDM) will include the experiences of teenagers and expand its survey of 4-year-olds in its biannual surveillance of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States.
Traditionally, researchers in the ADDM—part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—review health and educational records for 8-year-olds in their areas to assess how many qualify for an ASD diagnosis. The CDC uses these data to estimate ASD prevalence, estimated at 1 in 59 children earlier this year.
The network recently expanded to include data on 4-year-olds at half of the sites, as well as information on other conditions, such as cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. For 2018 and 2020, the CDC is adding teens to the data review—researchers at up to two sites will look at 16-year-olds who were previously identified as having ASD symptoms when they were 8. The new round of monitoring also will require all sites to track ASD in 4-year-olds.
The goal is to follow up on children first identified by the 2010 or 2012 surveillance, according to CDC officials. They anticipate that data collection on 16-year-olds will include a records review similar to that conducted for 8-year-olds. The review may also include whether previously identified children have other health conditions and what school and community services they are receiving.
The first data on teenagers are likely to be included in the CDC’s 2022 and 2024 reports.
The CDC is expected to release its next ASD prevalence estimates—based on data collected in 2016—in 2020. That report will be the agency’s first to rely primarily on diagnostic criteria for ASD adopted in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, effective in 2013.
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November 2018
Volume 23, Issue 11