Philadelphia Police Department Must Improve Communication With People Who Are Deaf The Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) will revamp its efforts to communicate with people who are deaf under a settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice. The settlement resolves allegations that PPD violated Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) by not taking appropriate steps to ensure that communications ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   October 01, 2018
Philadelphia Police Department Must Improve Communication With People Who Are Deaf
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   October 01, 2018
Philadelphia Police Department Must Improve Communication With People Who Are Deaf
The ASHA Leader, October 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.23102018.14
The ASHA Leader, October 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.23102018.14
The Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) will revamp its efforts to communicate with people who are deaf under a settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice.
The settlement resolves allegations that PPD violated Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) by not taking appropriate steps to ensure that communications with people with hearing loss were as effective as communications with others, and did not provide auxiliary aids and services necessary to ensure effective communication.
The Justice Department investigated PPD in response to a complaint from a detainee who is deaf. Under the settlement, PPD will adopt ADA policies and procedures on effective communication and appropriate auxiliary aids or services, train personnel on the ADA, provide accessible telephone equipment, and pay eight aggrieved people a total of $97,500.
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October 2018
Volume 23, Issue 10