Collaboration Yields Presentations About … Collaboration Three state associations jointly produce videos to illustrate the collaboration inherent to interprofessional practice. State of Success
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State of Success  |   September 01, 2018
Collaboration Yields Presentations About … Collaboration
Author Notes
  • Carol Polovoy is managing editor of The ASHA Leader. cpolovoy@asha.org
    Carol Polovoy is managing editor of The ASHA Leader. cpolovoy@asha.org×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / ASHA News & Member Stories / Normal Language Processing / State of Success
State of Success   |   September 01, 2018
Collaboration Yields Presentations About … Collaboration
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 38-39. doi:10.1044/leader.SOS.23092018.38
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 38-39. doi:10.1044/leader.SOS.23092018.38
A project to spread the word about interprofessional practice (IPP) to providers and consumers turned out to be … well, a successful exercise in exactly what IPP is all about—collaborative practice.
The project—creating videos about IPP and how it relates to audiologists’ and speech-language pathologists’ scope of practice and to three types of treatment (early intervention, literacy and autism)—brought together state association leaders from California, Michigan and South Carolina.
“We didn’t anticipate the amount of coordination it would take,” says Laura Lenkey, who was president of the Michigan association when the project launched in 2017. “The process was reflective of IPP itself and the struggle of IPP teams.”
But just as IPP is designed to achieve successful outcomes for clients and patients, this project also produced what its leaders consider successful outcomes: five videos to help professionals (both within and outside of communication sciences and disorders), parents, clients and patients understand how and why providers from different disciplines team up to assess and treat communication disorders.

“The process was reflective of IPP itself and the struggle of IPP teams.”

A casual conversation …
The project is rooted in a conversation among the three then-presidents of the California, Michigan and South Carolina associations at the 2017 Council of State Association Presidents meeting, according to Deborah Swain, then president of the California association.
Lenkey initiated a conversation with Jackie Jones-Brown, then president of the South Carolina association, and suggested asking Swain to join them. The three state association leaders tossed around the idea of a multi-state effort to better explain IPP to professionals and consumers.
“Professionals and consumers don’t necessarily understand the depth and breadth of our practice and how we work with others for improved client outcomes,” Swain says. “We wanted to make videos that explain how professionals can be more collaborative, so consumers will have the expectation that professionals will work together for better results.”
Tina Eichstadt, a senior project manager at Pearson Education and an SLP who was at the conference, offered the publishing company’s assistance with producing and editing content.
The three state associations applied for an ASHA State Association Grant, which helps ASHA-recognized state speech-language-hearing associations address issues in health care and education settings. Each received $6,000 for videography and other services.
Creative collaboration
Each state designated subject-matter experts—audiologists and speech-language pathologists—for the five topics (the two scopes of practice and the three types of treatment). They worked together to come up with the type of content the videos would address. Pearson helped with script editing and review and is promoting the videos.
A videographer visited the three states to record the subject-matter experts and, with input from them and the project’s coordinators, came up with the finished products.
The videos describe how IPP fits into the disciplines’ scope of practice, what it looks like in the specific treatment types, and how it includes working with a variety of professionals from other disciplines.
Material from the videos will be used to create short, audio-only public service announcements.
“It was definitely a fun project,” Jones-Brown says. “It was a chance to work with colleagues from across the state, all of whom have presented on and have expertise with IPP.”
Lenkey, who says she is “delighted” with the videos, noted that the production process mirrored the IPP experience in many ways: the group had to establish goals, clarify roles, maintain focus, rotate leadership in different stages of the process, work with different personalities, and meet electronically rather than in person.

The videos describe how IPP fits into the disciplines’ scope of practice, what it looks like in the specific treatment types, and how it includes working with a variety of professionals from other disciplines.

Available to all
The videos—available on the websites of all three associations and ASHA—are not state-specific and are relevant to consumers, students, audiologists and SLPs, and professionals from other disciplines who often collaborate with them.
“We want the videos to be a resource for our members,” Swain says. “They can increase their own awareness of IPP and show the videos to co-workers as well. The videos do a great job of showing what IPP looks like in early intervention and in literacy and autism treatment.”
Jones-Brown, a clinical educator at South Carolina State University, shows the videos to her graduate students. “Our students need to know more than a specific skill set,” she says. “The videos demonstrate what they need to know: how to work on a team, that their decisions will not be unilateral, that they have a responsibility to share information with other professionals.”
She also hopes that parents will have a chance to see the videos. Parents are sometimes overwhelmed at IEP meetings, she says, and wonder why so many people are at the table. “It can be intimidating,” she says, “and seeing a video about IPP in treating autism spectrum disorder could take the edge off.”
The three project leaders will present on the videos at the ASHA Convention in November. They also have plans to apply for another grant to produce videos on IPP treatment of additional disorders, including traumatic brain injury and aphasia.
“Consumers and professionals who see the videos will understand the depth and breadth of our practice and how we work with others for better outcomes,” Swain says. “As a result, professionals can become more collaborative, and consumers can expect professionals to work collaboratively to address their communication difficulties.”
To view the videos, visit any of these websites:
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September 2018
Volume 23, Issue 9