Specialized Teacher Training Associated With Improved ASD Outcomes Students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may reap benefits when their teachers receive a classroom-based, teacher-implemented intervention, indicates a study published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Benefits measured by Florida State University researchers included improvements in active engagement, adaptive communication, social skills and executive function. This cluster ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   September 01, 2018
Specialized Teacher Training Associated With Improved ASD Outcomes
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Professional Issues & Training / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   September 01, 2018
Specialized Teacher Training Associated With Improved ASD Outcomes
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23092018.15
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23092018.15
Students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may reap benefits when their teachers receive a classroom-based, teacher-implemented intervention, indicates a study published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Benefits measured by Florida State University researchers included improvements in active engagement, adaptive communication, social skills and executive function.
This cluster randomized trial over three years included 60 schools across 10 districts in California, Georgia and Florida. Across all schools there were 197 students with ASD (mean age of 6.79 years). The 129 classrooms received a random assignment of either autism training modules (ATMs), which included the regular classroom curriculum with supplemental online autism modules for teachers, or the SCERTS (Social, Communication, Emotional Regulation, and Transactional Support) curriculum.

Benefits measured included improved active engagement, adaptive communication, social skills and executive function.

The SCERTS intervention included, for teachers, three days of training, regular coaching and video recordings of their classroom performance. At the end of the study period, children in SCERTS classrooms recorded more classroom participation, improved social skills and increased back-and-forth conversations when compared to the ATM group.
“Schools are moving more toward modifying and adapting the mainstream classroom in ways that are not only helpful for kids with autism but also good for all the students,” says researcher Lindee Morgan, of the Department of Clinical Sciences and the Autism Institute at Florida State University’s College of Medicine.
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September 2018
Volume 23, Issue 9