New Drug Linked With Reduced Hearing Loss in Kids Post Chemo Administering the antioxidant sodium thiosulfate (STS) to cisplatin-treated children cut their risk of hearing loss by almost 50 percent in research published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London randomly assigned 109 children (1 month–18 years old) with liver cancer who had ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   September 01, 2018
New Drug Linked With Reduced Hearing Loss in Kids Post Chemo
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   September 01, 2018
New Drug Linked With Reduced Hearing Loss in Kids Post Chemo
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.23092018.15
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.23092018.15
Administering the antioxidant sodium thiosulfate (STS) to cisplatin-treated children cut their risk of hearing loss by almost 50 percent in research published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Researchers at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London randomly assigned 109 children (1 month–18 years old) with liver cancer who had received cisplatin (a type of chemotherapy) into two groups. One group received cisplatin alone while the other received cisplatin plus STS six hours later, for four preoperative and two postoperative courses. Hearing assessments occurred periodically: at baseline, during treatment and follow-up when possible, and in all patients at 3.5 years of follow-up.

Not only did STS reduce the incidence and severity of ototoxic effects, it did so without compromising overall and event-free survival.

The results showed that in the group treated with cisplatin alone, 63 percent experienced some degree of hearing loss. For children treated with cisplatin plus STS, 33 percent had a hearing loss. And not only was STS associated with reduced incidence and severity of ototoxic effects, it appeared not to compromise overall and event-free survival.
“This treatment combination could help ensure that parents aren’t faced with an upsetting scenario where successful cancer treatment comes at the cost of their child’s hearing,” says lead author Penelope Brock, pediatric consultant at Great Ormond Street Hospital.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2018
Volume 23, Issue 9