Meet the 2018 Convention Co-Chairs Sharon Sandridge and Melissa Jakubowitz reflect on the 2018 theme: “Revolutionary Learning, Evolutionary Practice.” Features
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Features  |   September 01, 2018
Meet the 2018 Convention Co-Chairs
Author Notes
  • Sharon A. Sandridge, PhD, CCC-A, Director, audiology clinical services, and clinical assistant professor of medicine, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic
    Sharon A. Sandridge, PhD, CCC-A, Director, audiology clinical services, and clinical assistant professor of medicine, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic×
  • Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP, President and founder, eLiveNow
    Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP, President and founder, eLiveNow×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Features
Features   |   September 01, 2018
Meet the 2018 Convention Co-Chairs
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 56-57. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC1.23092018.56
The ASHA Leader, September 2018, Vol. 23, 56-57. doi:10.1044/leader.ACC1.23092018.56
Sharon A. Sandridge, PhD, CCC-A
Director, audiology clinical services, and clinical assistant professor of medicine, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic
Q: What does “revolutionary learning” in communication sciences and disorders mean to you?
Revolutionary learning includes not only a unique way of learning but also how we think or process information. It is learning outside the proverbial box! Our goal was not only to include new and unique learning opportunities, such as hands-on labs, demo labs and master classes (an in-depth study for more advanced learners, see page 58), but also to challenge your thoughts and expectations with a new topic area—Innovations, Debates and Hot Topics in the Discipline—to showcase controversial and provocative methods, protocols or ideas
Q: What “evolutionary practice” has captured your attention—and why?
The profession of audiology is facing yet another major evolution involving our hearing aid business model, the expansion of cochlear implant candidacy, and expansion of our vestibular scope of practice, to name a few. For me, the changing landscape of how we provide amplification is consuming much of my professional time. Addressing the challenges of over-the-counter devices (including PSAPs), third-party administrators, and the big-box stores are opportunities to redefine how we practice.
Q: How would you describe the ASHA Convention to someone who has never attended?
It is three days of outstanding learning opportunities (more than 20 hours per day of audiology-specific educational sessions) and networking that can energize and empower you! For the audiologists, the educational program has offerings across the learning continuum, for the young and early-career attendees to seasoned professionals, and topics ranging from balance to cochlear implants to tinnitus and everything in between (see “All Ears,” page 18, for more details on our revamped audiology offerings this year). Plus, it’s not all work—and what better place to play than in Boston!
Q: What’s your favorite convention memory?
My fondest memory, and most nerve-racking, was when I gave my first presentation at ASHA as a graduate student—little did I know in 1983 that I would be the co-chair 35 years later.
Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP
President and founder, eLiveNow
Q: What does “revolutionary learning” in communication sciences and disorders mean to you?
Revolutionary learning has a few meanings. It is a groundbreaking and innovative way to learn, as well as a means to broaden one’s perspective to evolve our practice as clinicians. We have included some new and distinctive types of sessions, including hands-on labs that allow attendees to actually use devices and programs and experience them in real time, and master classes for our members who are looking for more advanced sessions to meet their unique needs. We also wanted to challenge our members with a new topic area—Innovations, Debates and Hot Topics in the Discipline—that was developed to have polite discussions about controversial and emerging topics and methods.
Q: What “evolutionary practice” has captured your attention—and why?
Telepractice is an area that will be evolutionary for speech-language pathology. It has grown significantly in the last 10 years with more and more clinicians wanting to develop their skills in this mode of service delivery. With recent developments in technology such as artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), I think that telepractice has the potential to evolve our practice in so many ways and to improve how we work with our clients!
Q: How would you describe the ASHA Convention to someone who has never attended?
For newcomers, ASHA can be a bit overwhelming with all the courses that are offered—particularly this year, when we have a record number of sessions! However, it is three days of intense learning, incredible networking and fun with colleagues. For the SLP, there is a course on just about every topic you could think of that covers all ages of clients, most settings and then some. Be sure to attend a course or two outside your own area, as you will learn something new—potentially something you can apply to your current work setting. It may also ignite a spark to expand your current practice or to dive deeper into an area you are passionate about.
Q: What’s your favorite convention memory?
I have two favorite memories: meeting Annie Glenn backstage before the Awards Ceremony and being on stage to become an ASHA Fellow!
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September 2018
Volume 23, Issue 9