Heads Up New School Year: Here I Come! Use these insights, resources and strategies to get pumped up for 2018–2019. School Matters
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School Matters  |   August 01, 2018
Heads Up New School Year: Here I Come!
Author Notes
  • Stacey Ellison Glasgow, MA, CCC-SLP, is ASHA associate director of school services in speech-language pathology. sglasgow@asha.org
    Stacey Ellison Glasgow, MA, CCC-SLP, is ASHA associate director of school services in speech-language pathology. sglasgow@asha.org×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / School Matters
School Matters   |   August 01, 2018
Heads Up New School Year: Here I Come!
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 36-37. doi:10.1044/leader.SCM.23082018.36
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 36-37. doi:10.1044/leader.SCM.23082018.36
As the new school year approaches, many questions come to mind. How did your students grow and change over the summer? How big will your caseload be? Did your school hire new staff members? The list goes on. Here are some tips to help you organize your thoughts and start the year with a motivated mindset.
Connect
Make time to stop by to greet your co-workers and get to know any new staff. Talk with them about ways you’d like to collaborate over the new year and what you’d like to learn from them. Share what you appreciate about them—and continue to do so all year long. In fact, take time to thank colleagues, including your administrative assistants, paraprofessionals, cafeteria workers, custodians, parent volunteers and anyone else, for the little things they do to help make your school a wonderful learning environment.
Better relationships improve working conditions and job satisfaction. Also, when you talk about scheduling or ideas to help a student, you’ve already developed a relationship with your co-worker. This can make your job easier and help your students progress.
So strengthen your network and enjoy your colleagues! Don’t forget to reach out to other school-based speech-language pathologists who share your experiences, challenges and successes. Join or start a regular meet-up with other SLPs in your district, find virtual groups on social media, and tap into professional resources. ASHA offers specialized resources through Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues. You can search the ASHA Community for “SLP schools” to find threads where you can ask questions, discuss successes and strategies, and learn about new resources or research.

Trust that you can accomplish certain difficult things like no one else in your school. You are unique and bring so much expertise to the students and staff!

Trust yourself
In his book “The Speed of Trust,” Stephen Covey suggests sorting picture cards of the people you work with into “I tend to trust this person” and “I tend to not trust this person” stacks. If your co-workers were completing this task, which stack would your picture be in? Do you make commitments and keep them? Do you set a goal and achieve it? Are you the team member that you would like to work with?
Your wealth of knowledge and skills will improve the lives of your students and in turn, make the job of the teacher easier. Trust that you can accomplish certain difficult things like no one else in your school. You are unique and bring so much expertise to the students and staff!
Reflect and recognize
Think about your strengths, successes and challenges from the past year. What did you do that made you feel proud? What did you learn that you want to continue to implement or remember going forward? Embrace feeling challenged. I used to think I should just know more. Now, 27 years later, I understand the benefit of being able to learn and grow consistently in my profession. No one can know it all.
Learn something new
There’s nothing more invigorating than learning a new skill, strategy or technique. Observe and discuss a behavioral strategy you really want to try with your school’s social worker, psychologist or special education teacher.
Try something new as a part of a cooperative learning team within your school, such as conducting five-minute walk-throughs in teams of five. Spend five minutes in one another’s classrooms silently observing. Then, meet together to talk about the great things you saw happening. For example, did you like the use of visuals, positive behavioral supports, transformative activities or encouraging language?
Perhaps you can implement one new thing you learned from a course or conference you attended within the past year? If you couldn’t attend courses or conferences over the summer, ASHA curates learning opportunities available to you throughout the year.

There’s nothing more invigorating than learning a new skill, strategy or technique.

Share your successes
With busy schedules, we may not take the time to let our principals and others know about speech-language services and their impact on our students’ lives. Find ways to share examples of how your services made a difference. This can go a long way toward helping others understand the role of the SLP and gain support for the work you do.
Offer to give a presentation during a staff meeting or PTA gathering. ASHA’s prepared presentations for school-based SLPs help you get the word out about the role of the SLP.
Reach out
When questions and challenges arise, contact the ASHA school services team. We are here to support members with resources and guidance to make your jobs a little easier. You can find us at schools@asha.org. We’re here, ready to assist. We look forward to connecting with you and wish you a fantastic school year!
ASHA to Host Schools Virtual Town Hall Meeting

High caseloads, excessive paperwork and documentation, diminishing school funding and accompanying personnel shortages, limited service-delivery options … school-based audiologists and speech-language pathologists will have the opportunity to hear answers to questions about these longstanding issues at the ASHA Schools Virtual Town Hall Meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 5–7 p.m. (EDT).

A panel of experts—school leaders, decision-makers and union representatives—will respond to concerns and questions. The panelists, whose combined efforts are required to effect change, will be asked to generate feasible solutions.

You can register to view the event and to raise a concern online. During the town hall, registrants can share their concerns and their feedback about panelists’ responses in an online discussion forum.

2 Comments
November 21, 2018
Jane Seaton
Confusion with links
Tried to access current issue using link included in email and continue to receive an unrelated article from August 2018 issue. How do I access articles in "current issue?"
November 26, 2018
Shelley Hutchins
Current Issue links
Hi June,
I'm not sure what email you have that contains the wrong links, but you can always access our current issues by clicking on the tab at the top of our home page labeled "All Issues": https://leader.pubs.asha.org/issue.aspx
I hope that helps!
Best, Shelley Hutchins
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August 2018
Volume 23, Issue 8