New Measurement Estimates Speech Dysfunction in ALS Patients An analysis of tongue, lip and jaw movement in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could shape their future speech treatment, according to a study published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University investigated how much people with moderate and severe ALS-related dysarthria struggled when ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2018
New Measurement Estimates Speech Dysfunction in ALS Patients
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Professional Issues & Training / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2018
New Measurement Estimates Speech Dysfunction in ALS Patients
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23082018.16
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23082018.16
An analysis of tongue, lip and jaw movement in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could shape their future speech treatment, according to a study published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University investigated how much people with moderate and severe ALS-related dysarthria struggled when moving their tongue or jaw.
The study included 22 people with ALS and 22 typically aging adults, and is an extension of a previous study that involved 14 people with ALS. Using the Wave System, a 3-D, portable electromagnetic articulograph, researchers measured the movement of tongue, lips and jaw via an electromagnetic field, while simultaneously recording acoustic signals. Participants then read words and sentences aloud from a script.

The results indicated that in participants with more severe dysarthria, tongue range of motion is reduced, while range of motion for the lower lip and jaw both increased.

The results indicated that in participants with more severe dysarthria, tongue range of motion is reduced, while range of motion for the lower lip and jaw both increased.
“This highlights the importance of range of motion for speech production, and indicates that if we change range of motion in people with the disorder, if we ask them to expand their overall work space for speech production, then we may see more understandable speech,” says Jimin Lee, assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders at Penn State.
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August 2018
Volume 23, Issue 8