Healthy Diet Linked With Lower Hearing Loss Risk in Women For women, healthy eating habits may help protect against age-related hearing loss. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed data from more than 81,000 women (ages 27–44), collected as part of the Nurse’s Study II in 1989. The longitudinal study, published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, followed the women ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   August 01, 2018
Healthy Diet Linked With Lower Hearing Loss Risk in Women
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   August 01, 2018
Healthy Diet Linked With Lower Hearing Loss Risk in Women
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.23082018.14
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.23082018.14
For women, healthy eating habits may help protect against age-related hearing loss. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed data from more than 81,000 women (ages 27–44), collected as part of the Nurse’s Study II in 1989. The longitudinal study, published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, followed the women for 22 years, with researchers collecting dietary information from participants every four years.
Via the regular dietary surveys, researchers calculated how closely women’s eating habits resembled one of three diets: the Alternate Mediterranean diet (AMED), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010).
Researchers then examined dietary adherence scores and risk of self-reported moderate or worse hearing loss. Women with nutrition habits resembling the AMED (a diet that includes extra-virgin olive oil, grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, nuts, fish and moderate intake of alcohol) or DASH (high in fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy, and low in sodium) had an almost 30-percent lower risk of moderate or worse hearing loss, compared with women whose diets resembled these dietary patterns the least.

Women with nutrition habits resembling the AMED or DASH diets had an almost 30 percent lower risk of moderate or worse hearing loss.

The AHEI-2010 diet (contains components similar to both AMED and DASH) yielded no statistically significant benefit.
Additionally, in a subcohort of 33,102 women with medical conditions that can be associated with hearing loss, researchers found that the AMED diet linked to a 47-percent lower risk of hearing loss, DASH to a 46-percent lower risk, and AHEI to a 29-percent lower risk.
“Although hearing loss is thought to be an unavoidable companion to aging, findings from our research have highlighted a number of dietary factors that can be modified and may reduce the risk of hearing loss,” says lead author Sharon Curhan of the Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.
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August 2018
Volume 23, Issue 8