Access Academics Looks at Simulation Technology Is simulation technology a viable option in clinical higher education? In the August 2018 issue of Access Academics and Research, two James Madison University professors address the value and efficacy of simulation technology for clinical education in communication sciences and disorders. Carol Dudding, director of online speech-language pathology, and Susan ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   August 01, 2018
Access Academics Looks at Simulation Technology
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   August 01, 2018
Access Academics Looks at Simulation Technology
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 62. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.23082018.62
The ASHA Leader, August 2018, Vol. 23, 62. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.23082018.62
Is simulation technology a viable option in clinical higher education?
In the August 2018 issue of Access Academics and Research, two James Madison University professors address the value and efficacy of simulation technology for clinical education in communication sciences and disorders.
Carol Dudding, director of online speech-language pathology, and Susan Ingram, assistant professor, cite current evidence and best practices in their discussion of how simulations help prepare students. They consider ways to incorporate simulation experiences into clinical practica and look to a future involving expansion of simulation technologies.
ASHA Access Academics and Research is a bimonthly electronic newsletter that addresses the specific needs of faculty, researchers, post-doctoral fellows and PhD students. To subscribe, send a blank email with the word “subscribe” in the subject line to access-academicsresearch@asha.org.
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August 2018
Volume 23, Issue 8