Curiosity Associated With Higher Academic Achievement Curiouser and curiouser: Children described as exhibiting curiosity are likely to perform better in school, suggests a study published in Pediatric Research. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, researchers from the University of Michigan’s (UM) C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and the Center for Human Growth and Development analyzed ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2018
Curiosity Associated With Higher Academic Achievement
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Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2018
Curiosity Associated With Higher Academic Achievement
The ASHA Leader, July 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23072018.14
The ASHA Leader, July 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23072018.14
Curiouser and curiouser: Children described as exhibiting curiosity are likely to perform better in school, suggests a study published in Pediatric Research.
Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, researchers from the University of Michigan’s (UM) C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and the Center for Human Growth and Development analyzed data from 6,200 kindergartners.

“Promoting curiosity in children, especially those from environments of economic disadvantage, may be an important, under-recognized way to address the achievement gap.”

Researchers measured curiosity via a parent-report behavioral questionnaire, and performed classroom assessments in reading and math. Results indicated that greater curiosity was associated with greater reading and math academic achievement, regardless of family income. The authors also noted that although children of lower socioeconomic status (SES) scored lower academically than their peers, those of lower SES described as curious performed on par academically with higher-SES children.
“Promoting curiosity in children, especially those from environments of economic disadvantage, may be an important, under-recognized way to address the achievement gap,” says lead researcher Prachi Shah, a developmental and behavioral pediatrician at Mott and assistant research scientist at UM’s Center for Human Growth and Development.
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July 2018
Volume 23, Issue 7