Hearing Aid Users Less Likely to be Hospitalized, Suggests Study Wearing hearing aids can reduce the probability of emergency room visits and hospitalizations, according to a study in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Researchers from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, found that for older adults with hearing loss, hearing aid use corresponded with lower hospitalization rates when compared to ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2018
Hearing Aid Users Less Likely to be Hospitalized, Suggests Study
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2018
Hearing Aid Users Less Likely to be Hospitalized, Suggests Study
The ASHA Leader, July 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23072018.14
The ASHA Leader, July 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23072018.14
Wearing hearing aids can reduce the probability of emergency room visits and hospitalizations, according to a study in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Researchers from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, found that for older adults with hearing loss, hearing aid use corresponded with lower hospitalization rates when compared to peers who did not wear them.
Using a cohort study of nationally representative data from 1,336 Medicare beneficiaries, the authors analyzed health care use and spending among older adults (at least 65 years old) with self-reported hearing loss.
The analysis showed that among those who self-reported hearing aid use, visits to the emergency department and hospitalizations were lower by two percentage points. Other notable findings indicate that use of hearing aids increased total health care spending by $1,125 and out-of-pocket costs by $325, but decreased Medicare spending by $71.
The authors suggest that this information might be useful for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in deciding on insurance coverage of hearing aids for older adults with hearing loss.

For those who self-reported hearing aid use, visits to the emergency department and hospitalizations were reduced by two percentage points.

“We hypothesize that use of hearing aids helps individuals with severe hearing loss to communicate better with their physicians and to have a more active lifestyle compared with those who do not use hearing aids,” said lead study author Elham Mahmoudi of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2018
Volume 23, Issue 7