South Carolina Must Support Communication of Inmates With Hearing Loss South Carolina inmates with hearing disabilities must be provided with effective communication and the opportunity to participate equally in the state’s prison programs and activities, according to a March 2018 settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and the South Carolina Department of Corrections (SCDC). Inmates with hearing disabilities alleged ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2018
South Carolina Must Support Communication of Inmates With Hearing Loss
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News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2018
South Carolina Must Support Communication of Inmates With Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, June 2018, Vol. 23, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.23062018.12
The ASHA Leader, June 2018, Vol. 23, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.23062018.12
South Carolina inmates with hearing disabilities must be provided with effective communication and the opportunity to participate equally in the state’s prison programs and activities, according to a March 2018 settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and the South Carolina Department of Corrections (SCDC).
Inmates with hearing disabilities alleged in an Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) complaint that SCDC failed to provide them with sign language interpreters and other auxiliary aids and services, and excluded them from vocational and religious programs because they are deaf.
Under the agreement, inmates with hearing disabilities will not be excluded from SCDC programs, including vocational and religious services. SCDC also must provide services equal to those provided to inmates who are not deaf—including auxiliary aides and services and qualified interpreters—in a timely manner, to ensure inmates’ effective communication. SCDC will also provide telecommunication services so that inmates with hearing disabilities can—as do other inmates—communicate with their families and attorneys.
Justice Department officials noted that SCDC cooperated fully with investigation of the complaint, and has committed to ensuring effective communication and providing equal access to its programs and services.
This agreement was reached under Title II of the ADA, which prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities by state and local governments.
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June 2018
Volume 23, Issue 6