Children With ASD Less Likely to Get Vaccines Children with autism spectrum disorder—and their siblings—are significantly less likely to be fully vaccinated than children unaffected by autism, according to a recently released study in JAMA Pediatrics. Ousseny Zerbo, a postdoctoral fellow with the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, and colleagues reviewed data on more than 3,700 ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   June 01, 2018
Children With ASD Less Likely to Get Vaccines
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   June 01, 2018
Children With ASD Less Likely to Get Vaccines
The ASHA Leader, June 2018, Vol. 23, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.23062018.12
The ASHA Leader, June 2018, Vol. 23, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.23062018.12
Children with autism spectrum disorder—and their siblings—are significantly less likely to be fully vaccinated than children unaffected by autism, according to a recently released study in JAMA Pediatrics.
Ousseny Zerbo, a postdoctoral fellow with the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, and colleagues reviewed data on more than 3,700 children born between 1995 and 2010 who had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) before age 5. They also looked at nearly 500,000 age-matched children without disorders.
Specifically, they looked at whether the children had received all the vaccines recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They found that 94 percent of children without ASD received all vaccines recommended for children between ages 4 and 6—but only 80 percent of children with ASD had been fully vaccinated.
The records of the younger siblings (born 1997–2014) of the children in the study revealed a similar pattern: 85 percent of younger siblings of children without ASD had been fully vaccinated by 11 months old, compared with 73 percent of younger siblings of children with ASD.
Data were collected from six health care sites: two in California and one each in Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Wisconsin.
Zerbo stressed that, despite continuing beliefs to the contrary, “we know through numerous scientific studies that there is no association between childhood vaccination and the incidence of autism spectrum disorders.”
However, Zerbo said his team found “large disparities in vaccination rates between children with and without autism spectrum disorders, as well as between their siblings.”
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June 2018
Volume 23, Issue 6