Study Indicates Forestry Workers at High Risk for Hearing Loss Fifteen percent of noise-exposed workers in the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting (AFFH) sector have hearing loss, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, the study also found that workers in aquaculture and logging are at a higher ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2018
Study Indicates Forestry Workers at High Risk for Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2018
Study Indicates Forestry Workers at High Risk for Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, May 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23052018.14
The ASHA Leader, May 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23052018.14
Fifteen percent of noise-exposed workers in the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting (AFFH) sector have hearing loss, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, the study also found that workers in aquaculture and logging are at a higher risk for hearing loss.
Researchers examined 17,299 audiograms of AFFH workers from 2003 to 2012. While the overall hearing loss prevalence of 15 percent was lower compared to all industries combined (19 percent), some sectors within AFFH exceeded overall prevalence.

Workers in the Forest Nurseries and Gathering of Forest Products recorded the highest rate of hearing loss, with 36 percent.

Workers in the areas of forest nurseries and gathering of forest products recorded the highest rate of hearing loss, with 36 percent. Other notable hearing loss rates included 22 percent of timber tract operations workers and 19 percent of fishing workers.
“Workers in the high-risk industries identified in this study would benefit from continued hearing conservation efforts,” says lead author Elizabeth Masterson of NIOSH.
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May 2018
Volume 23, Issue 5