Early-Education Programs Associated With Higher Rate of Degree Completion Participation in early-childhood intensive education programs correlates with a higher rate of postsecondary degree attainment later in life, finds a study in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers from the University of Minnesota Institute of Child Development and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs found that low-income children receiving enrichment services had a ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2018
Early-Education Programs Associated With Higher Rate of Degree Completion
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Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2018
Early-Education Programs Associated With Higher Rate of Degree Completion
The ASHA Leader, May 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23052018.14
The ASHA Leader, May 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23052018.14
Participation in early-childhood intensive education programs correlates with a higher rate of postsecondary degree attainment later in life, finds a study in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers from the University of Minnesota Institute of Child Development and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs found that low-income children receiving enrichment services had a 48-percent-higher rate of achieving an associate’s degree (or higher) by age 35.
As part of the Chicago Longitudinal Study, researchers assessed the educational and professional progress of 1,539 children who entered preschool in 1983 and 1984. The study sample included mostly low-income minority children from high-poverty neighborhoods in Chicago.

Low-income children receiving enrichment services had a 48-percent-higher rate of achieving an associate’s degree (or higher) by age 35.

A total of 989 students participated in the Chicago Public School District’s Child-Parent Centers (CPC) program. The CPC program provided not only school-based education enrichment for the children, but also comprehensive family services such as parental skills and job skills training, from preschool to third grade.
The comparison group of 550 children from randomly selected schools participated in other early-intervention programs in the Chicago area. During the study follow-up period (2002–2015), researchers tracked the higher education progress of the students. Students who participated in the CPC program from preschool through third grade showed a 48-percent increase in earning an associate’s degree or higher.
“A strong system of educational and family supports in a child’s first decade is an innovative way to improve educational outcomes leading to greater economic well-being,” says lead author Arthur J. Reynolds, a professor at the University of Minnesota Institute of Child Development and director of the Chicago Longitudinal Study. “The CPC program provides this.”
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May 2018
Volume 23, Issue 5