Computer-Based Language Analysis Predicts Psychosis Onset Automated language analysis of youths at high risk for developing psychosis correctly predicted a diagnosis with 79 to 83 percent accuracy, according to a recent study. Using computer-based speech analysis software, researchers from Mount Sinai evaluated speech patterns in two independent cohorts: 34 adolescents (average age 21–22) in New York ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   April 01, 2018
Computer-Based Language Analysis Predicts Psychosis Onset
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   April 01, 2018
Computer-Based Language Analysis Predicts Psychosis Onset
The ASHA Leader, April 2018, Vol. 23, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23042018.18
The ASHA Leader, April 2018, Vol. 23, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.23042018.18
Automated language analysis of youths at high risk for developing psychosis correctly predicted a diagnosis with 79 to 83 percent accuracy, according to a recent study.
Using computer-based speech analysis software, researchers from Mount Sinai evaluated speech patterns in two independent cohorts: 34 adolescents (average age 21–22) in New York City and 52 (ages 15–18) in Los Angeles. Published in World Psychiatry, the study used the computerized speech analysis to examine interview transcripts of the participants with a known psychosis onset within the next two years.
The software determined a diagnosis by evaluating irregularities in speech patterns, such as decreased semantic coherence (for example, tangential speech) and reduced use of possessive pronouns. In the New York City cohort, the software predicted the psychosis onset with 83 percent accuracy. In the Los Angeles cohort, the software achieved 79 percent accuracy.

The software determined a diagnosis by evaluating irregularities in speech patterns.

“This technology has the potential to improve prediction of psychosis and ultimately help us prevent psychosis by helping researchers develop remediation and training strategies that target the cognitive deficits that may underlie language disturbance,” says the study’s first author, Cheryl Corcoran, associate professor of psychiatry and program leader in psychosis risk at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
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April 2018
Volume 23, Issue 4