Adults on the Spectrum May Respond Less to Hearing Their Own Name A new study suggests one reason why adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) struggle with social interaction. Studies have shown that children at risk of an ASD diagnosis respond less to hearing their own name. Now, research from Ghent University in Belgium shows this same phenomenon in adults with an ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   April 01, 2018
Adults on the Spectrum May Respond Less to Hearing Their Own Name
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Hearing & Speech Perception / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   April 01, 2018
Adults on the Spectrum May Respond Less to Hearing Their Own Name
The ASHA Leader, April 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.23042018.14
The ASHA Leader, April 2018, Vol. 23, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.23042018.14
A new study suggests one reason why adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) struggle with social interaction.
Studies have shown that children at risk of an ASD diagnosis respond less to hearing their own name. Now, research from Ghent University in Belgium shows this same phenomenon in adults with an ASD diagnosis. Hearing your own name typically signals that another person wants to attract your attention, and neurotypical adults responding strongly to their own name is an important aspect of successful social interaction.
Researchers examined the brain’s response to hearing one’s own name—versus other names—in a group of 21 adults with ASD and a control group of 21 adults without ASD. In neurotypical adults, results showed the brain response to one’s own name was stronger than to other names. This preferential effect was completely absent in adults with ASD, and was related to diminished activity in the right temporoparietal junction.
This study, published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, is the first to show that brains of adults with ASD respond differently when hearing their own name, suggestive of a core deficit in self/other distinction associated with dysfunction of the temporoparietal junction. The study authors suggest future research to determine whether this atypical neural response to one’s own name could be a potential biological marker of ASD.
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April 2018
Volume 23, Issue 4