Algorithm May Help to Predict Language Development in Children With Cochlear Implants A new tool may be able to help predict how well a child will develop language after receiving a cochlear implant. Researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago created a machine-learning algorithm that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   April 01, 2018
Algorithm May Help to Predict Language Development in Children With Cochlear Implants
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Development / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   April 01, 2018
Algorithm May Help to Predict Language Development in Children With Cochlear Implants
The ASHA Leader, April 2018, Vol. 23, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.23042018.12
The ASHA Leader, April 2018, Vol. 23, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB1.23042018.12
A new tool may be able to help predict how well a child will develop language after receiving a cochlear implant.
Researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago created a machine-learning algorithm that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the child’s brain development immediately before surgery to predict how much language improvement can be expected.
This study’s novel use of artificial intelligence to understand brain structure underlying language development was published in January in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
Hearing loss early in life deprives the auditory areas of the brain of stimulation, which causes abnormal patterns of brain development. The study used brain scans to capture these abnormal patterns before surgery and constructed a machine-learning algorithm for predicting language development with a relatively high degree of accuracy, specificity and sensitivity.
“The ability to predict language development is important because it allows clinicians and educators to intervene with therapy to maximize language learning for the child,” says co-senior author Patrick C. M. Wong, a cognitive neuroscientist, professor, and director of the Brain and Mind Institute at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.
Although a cochlear implant enables many children with hearing loss to understand and develop speech, some children who received implants as infants or toddlers lag behind their normal-hearing peers. “The ability to forecast children at risk is the critical first step to improving their outcome,” says co-senior author Nancy M. Young, medical director of the Audiology and Cochlear Implant Programs at Lurie Children’s, and a surgeon and professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “It will lay the groundwork for future development and testing of customized therapies.”
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April 2018
Volume 23, Issue 4