Spotlight on Special Interest Group 10, Issues in Higher Education I joined a few SIGs in the 1990s, early in my academic career, to stay current in my teaching areas. SIG 10 provided me with a new peer group in higher education. Before the Internet and social media, Perspectives newsletters were a vital mechanism for keeping affiliates up-to-date. ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   March 01, 2018
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 10, Issues in Higher Education
Author Notes
  • Monica Gordon Pershey, EdD, CCC-SLP, is associate professor in the Speech and Hearing Program in Cleveland State University’s School of Health Sciences. She is the coordinator of SIG 10 and an affiliate of SIG 11, Administration and Supervision. m.pershey@csuohio.edu
    Monica Gordon Pershey, EdD, CCC-SLP, is associate professor in the Speech and Hearing Program in Cleveland State University’s School of Health Sciences. She is the coordinator of SIG 10 and an affiliate of SIG 11, Administration and Supervision. m.pershey@csuohio.edu×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   March 01, 2018
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 10, Issues in Higher Education
The ASHA Leader, March 2018, Vol. 23, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.23032018.np
The ASHA Leader, March 2018, Vol. 23, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.23032018.np
1. When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join?
I joined a few SIGs in the 1990s, early in my academic career, to stay current in my teaching areas. SIG 10 provided me with a new peer group in higher education. Before the Internet and social media, Perspectives newsletters were a vital mechanism for keeping affiliates up-to-date.
2. How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career?
First, I was delighted to publish in Perspectives and review manuscripts. Next, becoming involved as a SIG leader has been significant. It was an honor to be elected to the SIG 10 Coordinating Committee by the SIG affiliates, and to be elected by the committee to be the coordinator. Programming SIG 10’s ASHA Convention short course and invited session, hosting online chats and bringing Perspectives to publication have been the principal ways that I have grown in my knowledge of higher education issues and offered my services to benefit my academic peers.
3. How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution?
I factor ASHA service into my overall amount of service time. Academics deal with certain crunch times and we arrange our SIG commitments to not conflict. I’d say to people who are interested in SIG involvement, that everyone has been collegial and supportive when family or personal commitments take precedence. Being an active volunteer leader, I know that managing volunteers is different from managing employees. Volunteers are welcomed with gratitude for what they can do. As for seeking employers’ support, the SIG’s record speaks for itself. Prospective volunteers can share recent convention programs, Perspectives articles and SIG-crafted policy statements to convey that it is a distinction for employees to participate.
4. What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about Chats, conferences, or convention events?
Events for 2018 are not yet confirmed, but we anticipate a convention invited session and at least one short course, and several web chats.
5. What is your favorite recent Perspectives article, and why?
I have so many favorites! I probably read something from past Perspectives weekly. My main research interest is analysis of written discourse. Perspectives has excellent articles that meet my needs for studies of written language in young writers and in people with communication disorders. Currently I am using an article published in SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, “A Longitudinal Posthumous Study of Letter Writing in a Late Elderly Case,” as I analyze the diary writings of a person with aphasia.
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March 2018
Volume 23, Issue 3