One-Third of Adults With Hearing Loss Do Not Seek Treatment, Study Indicates Of the about 40 million adults in the U.S. who report hearing difficulties, nearly one-third have not sought help, found an observational study. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, and Harvard Medical School analyzed the results of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey of 36,690 adults (average age 47), ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   February 01, 2018
One-Third of Adults With Hearing Loss Do Not Seek Treatment, Study Indicates
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   February 01, 2018
One-Third of Adults With Hearing Loss Do Not Seek Treatment, Study Indicates
The ASHA Leader, February 2018, Vol. 23, 20. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23022018.20
The ASHA Leader, February 2018, Vol. 23, 20. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.23022018.20
Of the about 40 million adults in the U.S. who report hearing difficulties, nearly one-third have not sought help, found an observational study.
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, and Harvard Medical School analyzed the results of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey of 36,690 adults (average age 47), representing an estimated 239.6 million people.
Recently published in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, survey results showed 16.8 percent reported their hearing was less than “excellent or good,” ranging from “a little trouble hearing” to “deaf.”

“Improved awareness regarding referrals to otolaryngologists and audiologists … among clinicians may improve hearing loss care.”

However, less than 28 percent of this group had their hearing tested, and 32 percent had never seen a clinician for hearing problems. Additionally, of the adults who reported they do not “appreciate shouting,” 5.3 percent were recommended to have a cochlear implant (CI), but less than a quarter of those with a CI recommendation actually received a device.
In addressing this gap in self-reported hearing loss and receipt of services, the authors write, “Improved awareness regarding referrals to otolaryngologists and audiologists, as well as auditory rehabilitative options among clinicians, may improve hearing loss care.”
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February 2018
Volume 23, Issue 2