CDC Survey Finds Rise in Developmental Disabilities The number of American children with developmental disabilities increased by 1.23 percentage points—from 5.76 percent to 6.99 percent—from 2014 to 2016, according to figures released from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The overall increase in developmental disabilities in children ages 3 to 17 stems from a rise ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   February 01, 2018
CDC Survey Finds Rise in Developmental Disabilities
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Special Populations / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   February 01, 2018
CDC Survey Finds Rise in Developmental Disabilities
The ASHA Leader, February 2018, Vol. 23, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.23022018.16
The ASHA Leader, February 2018, Vol. 23, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.23022018.16
The number of American children with developmental disabilities increased by 1.23 percentage points—from 5.76 percent to 6.99 percent—from 2014 to 2016, according to figures released from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The overall increase in developmental disabilities in children ages 3 to 17 stems from a rise in the prevalence of children diagnosed with a developmental delay other than autism or intellectual disability, the federal agency said. The reported rates of those conditions remained stable.
The findings come from analysis of data collected through the National Health Interview Survey, a federal poll that asks people across the country about all types of health issues. In the survey, parents indicated if they had ever been told by a physician or health professional that their child had intellectual disability, autism or any other developmental delay.
The CDC found that prevalence of all conditions was “significantly higher” among boys than girls, and least common among Hispanic children compared to other racial or ethnic groups.
The rate of developmental disabilities in 2016 is lower than the rate indicated by similar surveys in some previous years. This finding that may reflect the current, more restrictive definition of developmental disabilities, which excludes some conditions, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities.
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February 2018
Volume 23, Issue 2