Civility at Work I was intrigued by the focus of the December 2017 Leader, “The Push for Civility at Work.” I recently retired from a large public university. Throughout my career there, the atmosphere among faculty, which reverberated to students and staff, was unhealthy. Many of the examples in Cynthia Clark’s “Seeking Civility ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   February 01, 2018
Civility at Work
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   February 01, 2018
Civility at Work
The ASHA Leader, February 2018, Vol. 23, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.23022018.6
The ASHA Leader, February 2018, Vol. 23, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.23022018.6
I was intrigued by the focus of the December 2017 Leader, “The Push for Civility at Work.” I recently retired from a large public university. Throughout my career there, the atmosphere among faculty, which reverberated to students and staff, was unhealthy. Many of the examples in Cynthia Clark’s “Seeking Civility Among Faculty” were taking place. I am sensitive, so it was hard for me to turn my back at the situation, especially because I was in a tenure-track position and had to “go with the flow.” The situation did not change much after I was tenured and promoted to full professor.
I unfortunately could not follow the advice in the article to ameliorate the atmosphere. I felt there was nowhere to begin. Most of my colleagues were used to the status quo and were content. Perhaps I was—and am—looking at the situation through the wrong lens, but I left without finding a solution. My colleagues from other universities considered my situation unusual. I realize there is no ideal workplace, but for years I went to work with a knot in my stomach and tried to avoid certain faculty members to get through the day.
I could collaborate with only one colleague, and because of our work together, my joy of teaching and the students, I survived. If we profess being experts in communication, we need to ensure that we can communicate among ourselves with greater success in the workplace and model for our students.
Name withheld by request

Thank you for writing with this response. We concur that working harder at workplace communication, and modeling better communication with each other, are important remedies for the problem of workplace incivility.

0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2018
Volume 23, Issue 2