Spotlight on Special Interest Group 19, Speech Science I joined SIG 19 when it was formed. I had been a member of SIG 5, Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders—when it included speech science—and I was thrilled to create a new SIG devoted to speech science. Through SIG 19 I’ve gotten valuable ideas for teaching my undergraduate course ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   January 01, 2018
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 19, Speech Science
Author Notes
  • Amy T. Neel, PhD, CCC-SLP, is associate professor, department of speech and hearing sciences, University of New Mexico. She is a member of the coordinating committee and editorial review committee of SIG 19. atneel@unm.edu
    Amy T. Neel, PhD, CCC-SLP, is associate professor, department of speech and hearing sciences, University of New Mexico. She is a member of the coordinating committee and editorial review committee of SIG 19. atneel@unm.edu ×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   January 01, 2018
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 19, Speech Science
The ASHA Leader, January 2018, Vol. 23, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.23012018.np
The ASHA Leader, January 2018, Vol. 23, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.23012018.np
1. When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join?
I joined SIG 19 when it was formed. I had been a member of SIG 5, Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders—when it included speech science—and I was thrilled to create a new SIG devoted to speech science.
2. How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career?
Through SIG 19 I’ve gotten valuable ideas for teaching my undergraduate course on speech science. I’ve also interacted, online and in person, with lots of other speech scientists, so I’ve enjoyed sharing ideas, challenges and solutions with them. SIG 19 has provided me with resources for my research as well. I’ve learned about techniques from Perspectives and from the discussion board. I’m also excited about the potential for collaborating with clinicians on finding speech science solutions for assessing and treating speech disorders in the real world.
3. How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution?
My university department considers national service to be an important aspect of our career, so they’ve supported my involvement as a member of the SIG 19 Coordinating Committee. I don’t mind devoting time to the SIG because speech science is my passion. I know that my involvement with speech science colleagues across the country (and even around the world) will lead to improvements in my teaching and progress in my research.
4. What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about? Chats, conferences or convention events?
SIG 19 always sponsors great events at the ASHA Convention, including presentations that are useful for practicing clinicians. This year we sponsored sessions on pseudoscience—understanding how false science can mislead us in choosing effective treatments for our clients—and on acoustic tools for assessing and treating speech disorders. I’m sure our events at the next ASHA Convention will be interesting and useful as well. Our discussion board is a great place to discuss ideas for teaching and research, and we welcome clinician discussions about using speech science techniques in diagnosis and treatment.
5. What is your favorite recent Perspectives article, and why?
I really enjoyed Alison Behrman’s recent article “Intelligibility and Accent Management.” Intelligibility is the gold standard outcome for treatment of speech disorders and differences. Behrman explained the speech science behind how listeners understand speech produced with a non-native accent, and then discussed implications for clinical practice. I love it when speech scientists provide information that is useful in the real-world clinic.
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January 2018
Volume 23, Issue 1