Spotlight on Special Interest Group 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity I joined SIG14 so long ago that I remember when Perspectives was sent via mail. I was excited to be part of an ASHA group that focused on culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) populations. At that time, articles on this subject were few and far between in journals, but ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   December 01, 2017
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
Author Notes
  • Melissa White, MS, CCC-SLP, is co-director of clinical services for Bilingual Therapies, Inc., in Atlanta, Georgia. She is associate coordinator of SIG 14. melidwhite@gmail.com
    Melissa White, MS, CCC-SLP, is co-director of clinical services for Bilingual Therapies, Inc., in Atlanta, Georgia. She is associate coordinator of SIG 14. melidwhite@gmail.com×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / ASHA News & Member Stories / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   December 01, 2017
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.22122017.np
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.22122017.np
1. When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join?
I joined SIG14 so long ago that I remember when Perspectives was sent via mail. I was excited to be part of an ASHA group that focused on culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) populations. At that time, articles on this subject were few and far between in journals, but that wasn’t the case in SIG14 Perspectives. I found information there that reflected the children on my caseload.
2. How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career?
It is wonderful to be part of a community of colleagues who are passionate about improving services for CLD children and adults. They inspire me and increase the body of work that is available to use as a professional. There have been many instances when I look through Perspectives or read a community post and think, “I’m dealing with this issue right now in my assessment” or “I can pass along this resource to a teacher.”
3. How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution?
As with most things in the speech world, scheduling is everything. Much of the work that I do with SIG 14 is easily done after work and on the weekends when necessary. When I became a SIG coordinating committee member, I had a conversation with my employer about the work that SIG14 does and how I apply it in the workplace. This helped with having flexibility for attending conventions and SIG events.
4. What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about? Chats, conferences or convention events?
SIG14 hosted some great events at the 2017 ASHA Convention in LA! We started the convention with our invited session “Challenges & Solutions in the Management of Acquired Cognitive-Linguistic Impairments in CLD Adults.” Later that night, SIG14 and MC2 (Multicultural Collective Concerns) hosted a movie night featuring the film “Talking Black in America.” On Friday, we held our affiliates meeting and our short course “Differentiating Language Difference from Language Impairment in Multicultural Preschool and School-Age Children: Practical Tools.” We also co-sponsored two sessions, “The 2017 National Academy of Sciences/Medicines Report on Dual Language Learners: Conclusions & Recommendations” and “Supporting Students & Families Who are Undocumented Immigrants in the Post-Election Environment.”
5. What is your favorite recent Perspectives article, and why?
I was fascinated by Betty Yu’s article “Code-Switching as a Communicative Resource within Routine, Bilingual Family Interactions for a Child on the Autism Spectrum.” As a code-switcher, I’ve had many difficult conversations with professionals who view code-switching as a negative. Individuals immediately think “the child is mixing up languages” and use that as a basis for recommending the use of only one language. Yu’s case study showed that the child’s code-switching followed a pattern that served a communicative purpose. The findings of the case study highlight what happens when you analyze and interpret data through a CLD lens.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2017
Volume 22, Issue 12