Cognitive Dysfunction May Be Early Indicator of Parkinson’s Risk Cognitive dysfunction could be a sign of an increased risk for Parkinson’s disease. According to a data analysis published in JAMA Neurology, poor baseline cognitive functioning was associated with the onset of parkinsonism—movement abnormalities such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability—and Parkinson’s disease. Researchers from Erasmus MC University Medical ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2017
Cognitive Dysfunction May Be Early Indicator of Parkinson’s Risk
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Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2017
Cognitive Dysfunction May Be Early Indicator of Parkinson’s Risk
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22122017.18
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22122017.18
Cognitive dysfunction could be a sign of an increased risk for Parkinson’s disease. According to a data analysis published in JAMA Neurology, poor baseline cognitive functioning was associated with the onset of parkinsonism—movement abnormalities such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability—and Parkinson’s disease.
Researchers from Erasmus MC University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, analyzed data from 7,386 participants in the Rotterdam Study. Of this group (mean age of 65), 57 percent were female.

Those who had an initial poor global cognition score showed a higher rate of incident parkinsonism.

After baseline assessment of cognitive abilities, participants were revisited eight years later, with 79 (1.1 percent) participants diagnosed with incident parkinsonism. Of this group, 57 (72.2 percent) received a diagnosis of probable Parkinson’s disease. Among patients with incident parkinsonism, 30.4 percent also developed dementia.
Those who had an initial poor global cognition score showed a higher rate of incident parkinsonism.
“Clarification of the early course of Parkinson’s disease with studies such as this may allow identification in time to change the course of disease,” say Ethan Brown and Caroline Tanner, authors of an accompanying editorial.
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December 2017
Volume 22, Issue 12