Home Literacy Activities May Help Kids Build Executive-Function Skills The more children are engaged in reading and writing activities at home, the greater their reading and writing achievements in school, indicates a five-year longitudinal study of 241 families. Researchers from the University of Washington collected data from parents via questionnaires sent home with students. The questionnaire asked parents if ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2017
Home Literacy Activities May Help Kids Build Executive-Function Skills
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Development / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2017
Home Literacy Activities May Help Kids Build Executive-Function Skills
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.22122017.18
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.22122017.18
The more children are engaged in reading and writing activities at home, the greater their reading and writing achievements in school, indicates a five-year longitudinal study of 241 families.
Researchers from the University of Washington collected data from parents via questionnaires sent home with students. The questionnaire asked parents if and how they assisted children with reading and writing, and how the child felt about literacy exercises.
The participants included a group of first- to fifth-graders and a group of third- through seventh-graders.

“Teacher, parent and student all have a part to play.”

The results, published in the Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, indicated that higher reading and writing achievement correlated with engaging in more literacy activities at home.
Also, parental ratings of children’s ability to self-regulate attention spans remained stable for the study duration, while executive functions, such as goal-setting, tended to improve in all students.
“Teacher, parent and student all have a part to play,” says study author Nicole Alston-Abel, a Federal Way Public Schools psychologist. “Fostering home-school partnerships that enhance and extend the experience of the learner can lead to lifelong habits that foster success.”
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December 2017
Volume 22, Issue 12