In the Zone These free paint chips are a great help if you’re using the Zones of Regulation, a program that helps kids learn to manage their emotions and behavior. The depth of color indicates the intensity of the feelings, and when students know the size of their feelings they can control ... Glimpses
Free
Glimpses  |   December 01, 2017
In the Zone
Author Notes
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Glimpses
Glimpses   |   December 01, 2017
In the Zone
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22122017.12
The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.22122017.12
These free paint chips are a great help if you’re using the Zones of Regulation, a program that helps kids learn to manage their emotions and behavior. The depth of color indicates the intensity of the feelings, and when students know the size of their feelings they can control their reactions: Are you feeling sad or miserable? Nervous or terrified? If you are feeling a little gloomy, should you be crying?
I also use the paint chips to provide a visual choice about a character’s feelings in a story re-tell. Students with autism spectrum disorder particularly benefit from having visual options when discussing a character’s feelings. Keeping the paint chips on a binder ring is convenient—I can hang them on an anchor chart stand or keep them on my lanyard for easy access.
About me:
I’m originally from Brooklyn, New York, but I now live in sunny San Diego. I work with middle- and elementary-age students, and I am particularly interested in autism, augmentative and alternative communication, and the Social Thinking program.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2017
Volume 22, Issue 12