Age-Related Hearing Loss May Lead to Provider-Patient Communication Breakdown Age-related hearing loss appears to take a toll on clinical communication in hospital and primary care settings, according to a new analysis. For the study, published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, researchers at the University of College Cork, Ireland, interviewed 100 patients, ages 60 and older (mean age of ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   November 01, 2017
Age-Related Hearing Loss May Lead to Provider-Patient Communication Breakdown
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   November 01, 2017
Age-Related Hearing Loss May Lead to Provider-Patient Communication Breakdown
The ASHA Leader, November 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.22112017.16
The ASHA Leader, November 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.22112017.16
For the study, published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, researchers at the University of College Cork, Ireland, interviewed 100 patients, ages 60 and older (mean age of 73). Of this group, 57 reported having hearing loss and 26 used a hearing aid device. Of all the respondents, 43 percent said they had misheard either a physician or a nurse during a primary care or hospital visit.
Researchers also asked respondents to provide context for any communication breakdowns with health care providers: 36 percent said they were confused by illness descriptions or instructions, 29 percent claimed to miss entire words or full sentences, and 27 percent said people talked too fast or multiple people talked at once, resulting in miscommunication.

“We need more research into the medical errors and costs caused by hearing loss and to examine methods to provide effective communication.”

The journal also published an invited commentary from Heather Weinreich of Johns Hopkins University on the need for effective patient-provider communication. “We need more research into the medical errors and costs caused by hearing loss and to examine methods to provide effective communication, so as to deliver high-quality patient-centered care,” she says.
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November 2017
Volume 22, Issue 11