Intensive Treatment May Improve Verbal Communication in Patients with Post-Stroke Chronic Aphasia Three weeks of intensive routine speech and language treatment was associated with improved verbal communication skills in patients with post-stroke chronic aphasia in a multi-center study. Published in the Lancet, the study examined the effect of immediate intensive speech and language treatment versus a three-week deferral of services for this ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   November 01, 2017
Intensive Treatment May Improve Verbal Communication in Patients with Post-Stroke Chronic Aphasia
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Special Populations / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   November 01, 2017
Intensive Treatment May Improve Verbal Communication in Patients with Post-Stroke Chronic Aphasia
The ASHA Leader, November 2017, Vol. 22, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.22112017.15
The ASHA Leader, November 2017, Vol. 22, 15. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.22112017.15
Three weeks of intensive routine speech and language treatment was associated with improved verbal communication skills in patients with post-stroke chronic aphasia in a multi-center study. Published in the Lancet, the study examined the effect of immediate intensive speech and language treatment versus a three-week deferral of services for this population.
The authors noted that although aphasia treatment guidelines recommend intensive speech and language treatment for chronic aphasia after stroke, there are few large-scale, class-1, randomized controlled trials on treatment effectiveness in the acute stages.
The study, across 19 centers in Germany, included 159 participants, ages 19 to 70, who had aphasia for at least six months. The intervention group underwent a speech and language treatment protocol. The control group experienced a three-week deferral of treatment.

Researchers noted a 10-percent improvement on average in verbal communication abilities in the intervention group.

Researchers administered the Amsterdam–Nijmegen Everyday Language Test A-scale to assess verbal communication effectiveness in everyday-life scenarios immediately after the three-week intensive treatment (minimum of 10 hours per week) and three-week treatment deferral. Researchers noted a 10-percent improvement on average in verbal communication abilities in the intervention group, but not in the deferral group.
The control group did, however, show similar improvements to the intervention group after receiving the three-week treatment following the three-week deferral. Additionally, follow-up assessments at three and six weeks post-therapy showed sustained improvement in both groups.
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November 2017
Volume 22, Issue 11