Access Audiology Looks at Occupational Hearing Loss The November issue of ASHA Access Audiology focuses on helping audiologists determine whether a worker’s hearing loss is from an occupational source. Per U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, audiologists may be professional supervisors of industry audiometric programs. Using data gathered from the employee and the workplace, the audiologist ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   November 01, 2017
Access Audiology Looks at Occupational Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   November 01, 2017
Access Audiology Looks at Occupational Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, November 2017, Vol. 22, 60. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.22112017.60
The ASHA Leader, November 2017, Vol. 22, 60. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.22112017.60
The November issue of ASHA Access Audiology focuses on helping audiologists determine whether a worker’s hearing loss is from an occupational source. Per U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, audiologists may be professional supervisors of industry audiometric programs. Using data gathered from the employee and the workplace, the audiologist can help determine if an employee’s hearing loss is work-related or from another source.
The featured author, Pamela Gordon duPont, MS, CCC-A, is founder of Gordon Hearing Conservation, a Connecticut-based company that works with businesses to evaluate and improve their hearing conservation programs.
Access Audiology is a bimonthly, open-access e-newsletter that features a focused clinical or practice-management article and other resources. To subscribe, send a blank e-mail with the word “subscribe” in the subject line to AccessAudiology@asha.org.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2017
Volume 22, Issue 11