Expected Soon: A Cognitive Hearing Aid That Filters Out Noise Researchers at Columbia University say they are close to developing a hearing aid that will help people understand conversation in noisy places. Using deep neural network models, researchers—led by Nima Mesgarani, associate professor of electrical engineering—have developed auditory attention decoding (AAD) methods that could make cognitively controlled hearing aids a ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   October 01, 2017
Expected Soon: A Cognitive Hearing Aid That Filters Out Noise
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   October 01, 2017
Expected Soon: A Cognitive Hearing Aid That Filters Out Noise
The ASHA Leader, October 2017, Vol. 22, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.22102017.11
The ASHA Leader, October 2017, Vol. 22, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.22102017.11
Researchers at Columbia University say they are close to developing a hearing aid that will help people understand conversation in noisy places.
Using deep neural network models, researchers—led by Nima Mesgarani, associate professor of electrical engineering—have developed auditory attention decoding (AAD) methods that could make cognitively controlled hearing aids a reality. The research combines work from speech engineering and auditory attention decoding.
The result of the research is a system that receives a single audio channel containing a mixture of speakers along with the listener’s neural signals, automatically separates the individual speakers in the mixture, determines which speaker is being listened to, and then amplifies the attended speaker’s voice to assist the listener—all in under 10 seconds.
“Our novel framework for AAD bridges the gap between the most recent advancements in speech processing technologies and speech prosthesis research,” says James O’Sullivan, lead author of the study, which appears in the Journal of Neural Engineering. “It moves us closer to the development of realistic hearing aid devices that can automatically and dynamically track a user’s direction of attention and amplify an attended speaker.”
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October 2017
Volume 22, Issue 10