In Support of APD I read with great interest the letter to the editor written by Jay Lucker (“Auditory Processing Disorder [APD] Is a Legitimate Clinical Entity”) and the article about “hidden” hearing loss, “Lost in the Midst,” both in the July 2017 issue. Quite frankly, the article supports APD with a different name. ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   October 01, 2017
In Support of APD
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Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Inbox
Inbox   |   October 01, 2017
In Support of APD
The ASHA Leader, October 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.22102017.4
The ASHA Leader, October 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.22102017.4
I read with great interest the letter to the editor written by Jay Lucker (“Auditory Processing Disorder [APD] Is a Legitimate Clinical Entity”) and the article about “hidden” hearing loss, “Lost in the Midst,” both in the July 2017 issue.
Quite frankly, the article supports APD with a different name. It is no surprise that we must listen to the patient’s concerns and complaints, regardless of what an audiogram—or any test, for that matter—reveals. What is ideal is the collaboration between audiologists and speech-language pathologists to successfully diagnose and treat these issues. We cannot expect an audiologist without specialized training to effectively diagnose or treat these disorders. The good news is that there are many capable professionals available to diagnose and treat APD. The International Association of Auditory Processing Specialists is one group of enthusiastic and dedicated professionals who strive to provide the best services possible.
Maryann P. Kaminsky, Glen Allen, Virginia

Thanks for your perspective and for this resource.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2017
Volume 22, Issue 10