Spotlight on Special Interest Group 3, Voice and Voice Disorders I joined SIG 3 when I graduated from the University of Utah. My mentor mentioned the community and it sounded like a wonderful way to network and learn directly from experts in the field. I also wanted to stay on top of issues that might affect my clinical practice. ... SIG Spotlight
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SIG Spotlight  |   September 01, 2017
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 3, Voice and Voice Disorders
Author Notes
  • Kristine Tanner, PhD, CCC-SLP, is assistant professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University. She is SIG 3 Perspectives Editor. kristine_tanner@byu.edu
    Kristine Tanner, PhD, CCC-SLP, is assistant professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University. She is SIG 3 Perspectives Editor. kristine_tanner@byu.edu×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / ASHA News & Member Stories / Speech, Voice & Prosody / SIG Spotlight
SIG Spotlight   |   September 01, 2017
Spotlight on Special Interest Group 3, Voice and Voice Disorders
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.22092017.np
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.SIGS.22092017.np
When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join?
I joined SIG 3 when I graduated from the University of Utah. My mentor mentioned the community and it sounded like a wonderful way to network and learn directly from experts in the field. I also wanted to stay on top of issues that might affect my clinical practice. I was excited to become part of a new professional family!
How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career?
The networking opportunities in SIG 3 are excellent. People are so generous with their time; I have contacted peers out-of-the-blue on the SIG 3 online community with questions and they respond. There are opportunities to really make a difference, like traveling to Capitol Hill to advocate for voice-care services. My own leadership skills have improved while working with outstanding leaders in our field. The group has been much more than a line on a resume.
How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution?
I remember hearing the adage: When you want something to get done, ask the busiest person in the room. I don’t think I’ve met anyone in our field who isn’t busy! In my experience, when you volunteer, other things in life fall into place. There are so many ways to be involved, including serving on the professional development committee, reviewing for Perspectives, engaging in the online community, sponsoring a new member and participating in the NSSLHA roundtable at convention, to name just a few. You can choose how much time you spend; it’s as easy as emailing the SIG 3 coordinator. Most institutions have a mission statement that includes professional service. When I’ve been willing to put in some of my own time, my institutions have always been willing to lend support, including paid time off or travel funds, too.
What upcoming events related to or sponsored by your SIG should everyone know about? Chats, conferences or convention events?
The ASHA Convention is just around the corner and will be packed with awesome SIG 3 events. Come to the affiliate meeting and the sponsored lectures. We also have excellent online chats with experts (our next one will be on transgender voice) and recently started an online journal club—a huge success! Our online community is a great place to ask questions and correspond with colleagues. Upcoming voice events and recent voice publications are regularly posted here.
What is your favorite recent Perspectives article, and why?
What an impossible choice! There have been outstanding articles on transgender voice, advances in voice assessment, voice treatment, age-specific voice care and translational research from emerging scientists, to name just a few. I love reading Perspectives now just as much as I did when I first joined SIG 3. It continues to be a great source for translational clinical knowledge, and the article length makes it a nice lunchtime read. And you can get CEUs! What’s not to love?
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FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2017
Volume 22, Issue 9