Wireless Cochlear Implant Electrodes Linked With Hearing Preservation A retrospective review published in the journal The Laryngoscope investigated which types of cochlear implants (CIs) are associated with increased long-term rates of hearing preservation after implantation. The researchers examined 196 patients (225 implants) with every type of CI, including three FDA-approved implants that use different types of electrodes to ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   September 01, 2017
Wireless Cochlear Implant Electrodes Linked With Hearing Preservation
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   September 01, 2017
Wireless Cochlear Implant Electrodes Linked With Hearing Preservation
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22092017.14
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, 14. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22092017.14
The researchers examined 196 patients (225 implants) with every type of CI, including three FDA-approved implants that use different types of electrodes to stimulate the auditory nerve. Their findings suggest electrodes with no wire may preserve long-term hearing more effectively than those with wires.

“This [study] … will have major implications for doctors and their patients who need their long-term hearing restored.”

Additionally, researchers found that round window/extended round window approaches (the surgical method of inserting the electrode into the scala tympani through the round window) were associated with higher rates of long-term hearing preservation than cochleostomy approaches (when the surgeon creates an opening in the cochlea to insert the electrode).
“We hope the findings will help surgeons choose the best implants and approaches for their patients,” says lead investigator George Wanna, director of the Center for Hearing and Balance and the Ear Institute at Mount Sinai Health System. “This is the largest clinical study done in the world on conventional electrodes and will have major implications for doctors and their patients who need their long-term hearing restored.”
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September 2017
Volume 22, Issue 9