Ohio Companies, Execs Pay $19.5 Million to Resolve Medicare Fraud Allegations Three companies and their executives have agreed to pay approximately $19.5 million to resolve allegations that they submitted false claims for medically unnecessary rehabilitation therapy and hospice services to Medicare. The allegations involved one of the largest nursing home operations in Ohio. Foundations Health Solutions Inc. provided management services to ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   September 01, 2017
Ohio Companies, Execs Pay $19.5 Million to Resolve Medicare Fraud Allegations
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Practice Management / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   September 01, 2017
Ohio Companies, Execs Pay $19.5 Million to Resolve Medicare Fraud Allegations
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.22092017.10
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB6.22092017.10
The allegations involved one of the largest nursing home operations in Ohio. Foundations Health Solutions Inc. provided management services to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) through corporate predecessors Provider Services Inc. and BCFL Holdings; Olympia Therapy provided rehabilitation therapy services and Tridia Hospice Care provided hospice services to patients at SNFs managed by those companies. Brian Colleran and Daniel Parker partially controlled or owned the companies and corporate predecessors.
The settlement resolves allegations that, from January 2008 through December 2012, the companies submitted false claims to Medicare for medically unnecessary rehabilitation therapy services at 18 SNFs to increase Medicare reimbursement.
Other allegations included submission of false claims for hospice services to ineligible patients and the solicitation of kickbacks to refer patients from SNFs to a specific home health care provider.
The settlement resolves allegations filed in two separate whistleblower lawsuits by a former Olympia employee and two former Tridia employees under the whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act, which permit private individuals to sue on behalf of the government for false claims and to share in any recovery. The claims resolved by the settlement are allegations, with no determination of liability.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2017
Volume 22, Issue 9