Advice for Grad Students I commend Katrina Killian for her insightful article, “I Made It Into Grad School … Now What?” (April 2017). As a longtime student and professor of audiology, I appreciate her helpful gems to the upcoming cadre of audiologists and speech-language pathologists. I support and amplify two of her comments about ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   September 01, 2017
Advice for Grad Students
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Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Inbox
Inbox   |   September 01, 2017
Advice for Grad Students
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.22092017.4
The ASHA Leader, September 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.22092017.4
I commend Katrina Killian for her insightful article, “I Made It Into Grad School … Now What?” (April 2017). As a longtime student and professor of audiology, I appreciate her helpful gems to the upcoming cadre of audiologists and speech-language pathologists. I support and amplify two of her comments about organizing and keeping notes for future reference. I also support her suggestion of not stressing about grades (which many students seem to feel is paramount), but instead focusing on learning and understanding the material. I shall do that by meshing these suggestions in the following paragraph.
When students, undergraduate or graduate, would request an appointment to ask how they might improve my evaluation of them (their grades), I would ask them to bring their class notes to our meeting. I often found those notes to be accurate but cryptic. My recommendation: Take notes that are so clear, logical and organized that the student (or others in communication sciences and disorders) will easily understand them when they study (cram?) for a final examination, and also years later when they go back to their notes for a professional organization’s or a state’s licensure exam. (I would sometimes add that my recommendation could help the student in all the classes they take, not just communication disorders classes.) These ideas often would lead to the improvement they (and I) wanted.
Other professors may have additional ideas for assisting their students. I would hope their suggestions would be encouraged and publicized as well.
Richard H. Sweetman, Louisville, Colorado

Thanks for your advice to aspiring audiologists and speech-language pathologists!

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FROM THIS ISSUE
September 2017
Volume 22, Issue 9