Extrapolating Data I am writing regarding the article “Nicotine Exposure May Cause Auditory Processing Problems in Mice” (June 2017). The article states that “Children exposed to nicotine … could have hearing problems caused by abnormal development of the auditory brainstem, suggests new research on mice.” I find it very disconcerting that in ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   August 01, 2017
Extrapolating Data
Author Notes
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Inbox
Inbox   |   August 01, 2017
Extrapolating Data
The ASHA Leader, August 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.22082017.4
The ASHA Leader, August 2017, Vol. 22, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.22082017.4
I am writing regarding the article “Nicotine Exposure May Cause Auditory Processing Problems in Mice” (June 2017). The article states that “Children exposed to nicotine … could have hearing problems caused by abnormal development of the auditory brainstem, suggests new research on mice.”
I find it very disconcerting that in 2017, some writers and researchers continue to extrapolate anatomical/physiological data from nonhuman animals (in this case, brain dissections of mice) to human behavior. As an SLP working with human patients, this study holds no value for me. Because I would like to know more definitely whether exposure to nicotine can cause auditory processing, speech-language and/or learning problems in humans, I recommend a research protocol that has validity for human behavior and does not involve killing the subjects. (It should be noted that even if mice and rats are not killed in an experiment, their treatment is not protected under the federal Animal Welfare Act.)
Why not study the behaviors of interest in two groups of actual human children, those who have been exposed to nicotine and those who have not? Such a study would yield directly useful clinical information from humanely treated subjects. What a concept!
—Shirley Charney Feldman, Montgomery Village, Maryland

Phases of scientific discovery proceed from proof of concept—often conducted in animal models—to human trials. The Leader often reports on the various phases of scientific inquiry and strives to keep readers informed of emerging trends in science and their potential implications.

0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2017
Volume 22, Issue 8