Hearing Loss Severity Tied to Vestibular Aqueduct Width in EVA Researchers may have found a way to predict hearing-loss severity in children with enlarged vestibular aqueducts, according to a new study. In a retrospective review, physicians and scientists from University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA) Research Project identified a link between increases in vestibular aqueduct width ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2017
Hearing Loss Severity Tied to Vestibular Aqueduct Width in EVA
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Balance & Balance Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2017
Hearing Loss Severity Tied to Vestibular Aqueduct Width in EVA
The ASHA Leader, July 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.22072017.16
The ASHA Leader, July 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.22072017.16
In a retrospective review, physicians and scientists from University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA) Research Project identified a link between increases in vestibular aqueduct width and increased hearing loss progression in children. The study appears in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
“This study may not change the treatment protocols already in place for children diagnosed with EVA in the short term, but it will enable physicians and families to appropriately plan a care trajectory that maximizes the child’s quality of life,” says lead author Todd D. Otteson, chief of pediatric otolaryngology at UH Rainbow.
Otteson and his colleagues studied records of 52 children with EVA (29 females and 23 males with a median age of 8 years old) from the UH Rainbow Department of Otolaryngology, which included information about speech-reception thresholds and word-recognition scores.
Above 1.5 millimeters of width, each additional millimeter in the vestibular aqueduct was associated with an increase of 17.5 decibels in speech-reception threshold and a decrease of 21 percent in word-recognition scores.
Although EVA symptoms vary, the authors note, vestibular aqueduct width could be useful for clinicians in counseling patients with EVA on hearing loss prognosis.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2017
Volume 22, Issue 7