Young Adults With ASD Concerned About Lack of Financial Skills Teenagers and young adults with autism know that gaining financial independence is important, but some say they lack the skills to attain that marker of adulthood, according to a qualitative study from the University of Missouri. Paying bills and filing taxes can be a sudden, anxiety-producing reality for young adults ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   July 01, 2017
Young Adults With ASD Concerned About Lack of Financial Skills
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   July 01, 2017
Young Adults With ASD Concerned About Lack of Financial Skills
The ASHA Leader, July 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22072017.16
The ASHA Leader, July 2017, Vol. 22, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.22072017.16
Teenagers and young adults with autism know that gaining financial independence is important, but some say they lack the skills to attain that marker of adulthood, according to a qualitative study from the University of Missouri.
Paying bills and filing taxes can be a sudden, anxiety-producing reality for young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), just as they age out of services. In interviews with 27 participants (ages 16–25) with ASD, lead study author Nancy Cheak-Zamora and her colleagues found common threads about money and adulthood.
“Most of the participants saw a definite association between adulthood and handling money,” says Cheak-Zamora, assistant professor in the School of Health Professions at Missouri. “Participants agreed that independence required managing finances, and all expressed frustration in their own abilities when it came to knowing how to handle and use money. According to the participants, the lack of financial skills has serious consequences on their ability to assume adult responsibilities.”
The study appears in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.
The research team, which conducted the interviews surrounding the topic of independence in 30- to 60-minute sessions, identified three key themes: participants defined independence by the ability to manage finances, they worried about their own financial skills, and they highlighted that lack of skill as an obstacle to independence.
Cheak-Zamora and her team suggest their findings show a need for financial literacy programs provided relatively early to meet the needs of teenagers and young adults with ASD. They add that parents can also play a role in teaching money-management skills.
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July 2017
Volume 22, Issue 7